As a learning organization, we believe in evaluating our impact so that we can correct our mistakes and amplify our successes as soon as possible.

Poverty indicators

We use specific poverty indicators such as quality of housing, income, nutrition, health and education to help us find those women who exist in the bottom economic tier within Uganda; only these women qualify to enter our programs. We also use these indicators to determine the success of our programs, and tailor them for each region within which we work. We measure improvements in the lives of our members. 

Baseline and exit evaluations

We evaluate all members at least twice while they are in our program, once upon entry and again six months after they graduate. We randomly select some groups to be evaluated a third time two years after graduating in order to measure the long term impact of our programs on their lives.

Long term evaluation

Our most recent long-term evaluation focused on a group more than two years after their graduation. Some of our key results include:

  • Our members were able to spend twice as much on basic needs two years after graduating than they had before they joined our program.
  • Housing conditions for our members improved significantly in that the percent of families living in a permanent home grew from 47% to 64%, and those living in mud houses decreased from 14% to just 4%.
  • 95% of our graduates reported that their children were in school. We also learned that many of our members were responsible for educating an average of one more child, which indicates that they were wealthy enough to educate the child of a relative.
  • Our graduates were able to purchase more assets. One third of our members acquired land and assets like livestock, bicycles, mattresses and furniture.

95% of our graduates reported that their children were in school.

 

Women were able to spend twice as much on basic needs just two years after their graduation.